Los Angeles in the 1970s
Jun
8
7:00 pm19:00

Los Angeles in the 1970s

  • Glendale Public Library

David Kukoff, editor of the collection, will present Los Angeles in the 1970s along with a panel of contributors.

Jun
17
3:00 pm15:00

Jane Constantineau presents Kill The Gringo at A Classic Tale Bookstore in Ramona, CA

Jack Hood Vaughn served as director of the Peace Corps, ambassador to Panama and Colombia, and Assistant Secretary of State during the sixties. Jack had a front-row seat for some of the most dramatic international events of the later half of the twentieth century, including the US intervention in the Dominican Republic, the Iranian revolution, and the reign of Panamanian dictators Omar Torrijos and Manuel Noriega. Jack survived multiple plane crashes, muggings, and assassination attempts.

Jane Vaughn Constantineau is Jack Hood Vaughn’s daughter. A graduate of Williams College and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern, she lives with her family in San Diego.

Jane Constantineau presents Kill The Gringo: The Life of Jack Hood Vaughn

A Classic Tale Bookstore | 780 Main St a, Ramona, CA 92065

"Before there was Indiana Jones there was Jack Vaughn, the fearless Peace Corps executive plunging into some of the most dangerous territory on earth to spread the story of American values. Jack's life story is at once inspirational and terrifying, such a compelling combination for this modest man who looked like a country doctor and lived like a poster for a Harrison Ford movie."

Tom Brokaw, Journalist and author of A Lucky Life Interrupted
 

Kill the Gringo is the wide-ranging, action-packed memoir of Jack Hood Vaughn, whose career in diplomacy, social advocacy, and conservation spanned more than twenty-five jobs and eleven countries.

A professional boxer during his college years, Jack joined the Marines in 1941, fighting in the battles of Guam and Okinawa during World War II. His rapport with people and facility with language led to a speedy rise in international development in Latin America and Africa, where he drew the attention of Vice President Lyndon Johnson during his visit to Senegal in 1961. Three years later, President Johnson appointed Jack ambassador to Panama when violent anti-American riots there led to a severing of diplomatic ties.

As the second director of the Peace Corps, Jack presided over the largest number of volunteers in the organization’s history and the delicate handling of anti-Vietnam fervor among its ranks. After his foreign service career, Jack led the National Urban Coalition and Planned Parenthood during the turbulent late 60’s and early 70’s. A rural development job in Iran ended dramatically with the 1978 revolution, and Jack turned his focus to the environment, advising the Nature Conservancy and founding Conservation International in 1987. Told with Jacks’ humor and humility, his stories reveal an astonishingly varied, lively and distinguished career that lasted 50 years and earned him the nickname Peasant Ambassador.

Jun
21
4:30 pm16:30

P. F. Kluge presents and signs The Williamson Turn at Kenyon College Bookstore

"P. F. Kluge is one of the great chroniclers of human experience. Like Richard Russo and Philip Roth, his stories map the human heart without sentimentality or pretension."

John Green, author of The Fault in Our Stars

Born in Berkeley, Heights, New Jersey, P.F. Kluge attended Kenyon College and the University of Chicago, and served in the U.S. Peace Corps (in Micronesia). He has worked as a reporter at the Wall Street Journal and as an editor at Life magazine. He has written for numerous publications, including Playboy, Rolling Stone, Smithsonian, as well as a contributing editor at National Geographic Traveler. As Writer-in-Residence at Kenyon, Kluge specializes in the reading and writing of American literature. He is a reporter, a writer and a teacher. The Williamson Turn is his twelfth book.

P. F. Kluge presents and signs The Williamson Turn

Kenyon College Bookstore | 106 Gaskin Ave Gambier, Ohio 43022

"When you’re on a three-and-a-half month voyage around the world, you ought to be able to sit and consider the sea."

Will Post, a celebrated and sometimes controversial columnist, is a professor on the MV Explorer's Semester at Sea program, sailing around the world teaching the ups and downs of travel writing, while navigating the discomfort of three months at sea, as well as the uncomfortable truths that many of their stops bring up―poverty, colonialism, and violence, to name a few.

A novel of loneliness, death, and friendship, The Williamson Turn deftly explores what it is to be an American traveling the world, and how our relationships to each other can be comforting, challenging, and at times alienating. It is a novel of torch-passing and nostalgia, of dealing with how life turned out, whether or not it was as planned. With P. F. Kluge's deft writing and sharp reflections, The Williamson Turn and its hero Will Post are not soon forgotten.

Jul
6
7:00 pm19:00

Emil DeAndreis presents and signs Hard To Grip at Books, Inc. in Berkeley, CA

"A vibrant depiction of a ballplayer that finds his way despite losing his ability to play the game he loves. Emil is a total gamer and a wonderful writer. Grab some time, and enjoy." —Mike Krukow, former Major League pitcher, Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies, San Francisco Giants; color commentator, San Francisco Giants

Emil DeAndreis is the author of Beyond Folly (Blue Cubicle Press). He is a high school baseball coach, and he teaches English at College of San Mateo. He lives in San Francisco with his wife.

"The soul of baseball is in the stories it tells. Hard to Grip is an inspirational, sad and amusing tale of a real life, told right by Emil DeAndreis." —Tim Brown, co-author with Jim Abbott, New York Times best-seller Imperfect: An Improbable Life; co-author with Rick Ankiel, The Phenomenom

"Hard to Grip is the genuine article: A baseball story about a player and his traumatic, insane, hilarious and completely relatable love of the game—and how fragile that love is." —Dirk Hayhurst, former professional baseball pitcher; author, New York Times best-seller The Bullpen Gospels

"Hard to Grip is a quintessential baseball story: one of talent, success, disappointment and redemption. DeAndreis writes with honesty and humor about losing the sport that was once his identity, and his struggle to find a new one." —Justin St. Germain, author, Son of a Gun and winner, 2013 Barnes & Noble Great New Writers Award for Nonfiction

Emil De Andreis presents and signs Hard to Grip

Books, Inc. Berkeley, CA | 1491 Shattuck Ave, Berkeley, CA 94710

In 2008, after a record-breaking career as a D1 college baseball player, Emil DeAndreis' life seemed set: He was twenty-three, in great shape, and had just been offered a contract to pitch professionally in Europe. 
 

Then his body fell apart. 
 

It started with elbow stiffness, then swelling in his wrist. Soon, his fingers were too bloated to grip a baseball. He had Rheumatoid Arthritis, a disease that causes swelling and eventual deterioration of the joints, mostly targeting old people and women. 
 

Hard To Grip tells the story of a young man’s body giving out when he needs it most. It chronicles an ascending sports career, the ups and downs of life in the NCAA, and the challenges of letting go of pro baseball due to a dehumanizing condition. In a series of humorous anecdotes, Emil takes the reader on his bittersweet journey of a young man’s having to grapple with an “old woman’s disease.” From striking out future major leaguer All Stars, to sitting in support groups; from breaking university records, to barely making it up the stairs; from language barriers with Chinese healers to figuring out how to be employed as a vegetable, this book unveils the disease with humor and fearless honesty through the eyes of an unlikely victim. This memoir is an honest, rueful and at times hilarious story about learning to come to terms with a new reality, and an inspiring account of how Emil learned to run with the disease and not from it.

Jul
11
6:30 pm18:30

Deena Metzger presents and signs A Rain of Night Birds at Book Passage Ferry Plaza

Deena Metzger is a writer and healer living at the end of the road in Topanga, California. Deena is a radical thinker on behalf of the natural world and planetary survival, a teacher of writing and healing practices for 50 years and a writer and activist profoundly concerned with peacemaking, restoration and sanctuary for a beleaguered world. She has been convening ReVisioning Medicine bringing Indigenous medicine ways to heal the medical world since 2004, and is imagining a Literature of Restoration as foundations of a new viable culture. She, with writer Michael Ortiz Hill, introduced Dare to North America in 1999. Dare and the 19 Ways Training for the 5th World, are unique forms of individual, community and environmental healing based on Indigenous and contemporary medicine and wisdom traditions.

Deena Metzger presents and signs A Rain of Night Birds

Book Passage | Ferry Plaza | 1 Ferry Building # 42, San Francisco, CA 94111

Perhaps never before in the history of humankind has the disparity between Indigenous mind and Western mind been more on the pulse of what we must pay attention to in order to insure our survival. Deena Metzger has written a novel in which two people, who are from each side of this polarity, begin a loving relationship. Sandra Birdswell is a student of climatology with an uncanny ability to sense weather events. Her mother, who died in childbirth, is a mystery to her. Her father, John, formerly a Reservation doctor, faithfully raises her despite his limitations and obligations. She first meets Terrence, a Native man and a professor of climatology, at her university classes. Years later, they are drawn together by the powerful forces of their love, for the Earth, for each other, and their mutual need to seek out the broken links of their family histories. When the UN report on climate change is released in 2007, the reality of the effects of the Anthropocene era sends a shockwave through both their lives. Their relationship to each other and to the elementals they are so intimate with lightning, thunder, rain, mountain brings them deeply and violently into a quest to live their lives in ways that disengage from colonial mind, the same mind that brought devastation to the Native peoples, and now brings all of humanity to the brink of extinction. Through their love of and deeply felt intuitive connection to the Earth, they each go to the brink of death to find their truth, to gain strength and wisdom.

Shawna Kenney & Rich Dolinger present Live at the Safari Club
Sep
5
7:30 pm19:30

Shawna Kenney & Rich Dolinger present Live at the Safari Club

  • Skylight Books

Shawna Kenney and Rich Dolinger present Live at the Safari Club: A History of HarDCore Punk in the Nation's Capital, 1988-1998. They will be joined by Mike Gitter, author of xXx Fanzine 83-88 (Bridge 9 Records) and moderated by Ron Martinez, singer of Final Conflict.

Nov
14
7:30 pm19:30

David Rocklin launches The Night Language at Skylight Books

"The Night Language is a rare achievement: lush language and classic storytelling with a contemporary feel that renders its history palpable. It is also a love letter to the artist, the outcast, the othered. Keep it by your bedside, read it in the early hours―it will not fail to inspire you."
Garrard Conley, author of Boy Erased

"Not since Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient have I read a novel in which a character―The story and skinsong of Alamayou―has haunted language, history, and heart so intensely. David Rocklin's novel The Night Language is a book of longing. Longing for history to unravel and retell itself around those whose buried voices and bodies truly mattered, longing for time to reverse and make decolonization possible, power giving way to intimacy, longing for art to bring a body back home, longing for language to unmoor itself and bring us back to life. If you read one novel this year, let it be The Night Language. It is still possible for a reader’s heart to be broken back open."
Lidia Yuknavitch, author of The Book of Joan, The Small Backs of Children, and The Chronology of Water

The Night Language is a postcard sent from a lost time and place but postmarked today. As he surveys the crisscross borders of gender and race in a troubled past, David Rocklin draws a line around the heart of our troubled present: the price of war, the privilege of wealth, the poison of xenophobia. Also: the wordless power of love. The shadows of two black men, an African prince and a British apprentice, dance together out of a forgotten history right into the here and now.
Martin Pousson, author of Black Sheep Boy

David Rocklin launches The Night Language

Skylight Books | 1818 N. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles, CA

The Night Language tells the story of a young man, Prince Alamayou of Abyssinia (present day Ethiopia), who is taken from his home and the Abyssinian war to the court of Queen Victoria―a world he knows nothing about.

With him is Philip Layard, a young apprentice to one of the doctors on the battlefield in Abyssinia, who becomes Alamayou's guardian, only friend, and eventually, the love of his life. When Parliament accuses Alamayou of murder, the young prince is sentenced to return to Abyssinia, where he will be executed.

His only hope comes from the very thing that cannot be uttered: the unexpected and forbidden love between Alamayou and Philip.

Inspired by true events, The Night Language is a unique novel of love, loss, and the consequences of repressive societies.

ABOUT DAVID ROCKLIN

David Rocklin is the author of The Luminist and the founder/curator of Roar Shack, a monthly reading series in Los Angeles. He was born and raised in Chicago and now lives in LA with his wife, daughters and a 150 lb Great Dane who seriously needs to stay on his own bed. He’s currently at work on his next novel, The Electric Love Song of Fleischl Berger.


Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
28
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
21
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
14
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Zach Wyner & Why There Are Words
May
11
7:00 pm19:00

Zach Wyner & Why There Are Words

  • Studio 333

Join Why There Are Words (WTAW) on May 11, 2017, at Studio 333 in Sausalito as seven acclaimed authors including Zach Wyner, author of What We Never Had, explore the theme Suggestible. Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. Entry fee is $10 at the door, though donations to WTAW, a 501(c)3 nonprofit are always welcome.

More information: http://www.whytherearewords.com/2017/04/18/why-there-are-words-sausalito-presents-suggestible/

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
7
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Jim McDermott presents Bitter Is the Wind
May
6
2:00 pm14:00

Jim McDermott presents Bitter Is the Wind

  • Barnes & Noble

Jim McDermott, author of Bitter Is the Wind, will participate in a panel with local authors about fiction writing. He will be joined by Tanya J. Peterson and William L. Sullivan.

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
Apr
30
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Los Angeles Times Festival of Books
Apr
22
Apr 23

Los Angeles Times Festival of Books

  • USC

Come join Rare Bird at the 2017 LA Times Festival of Books!

We will be located at Booth 125, along with our good friends at ZYZZYVA. Some of our authors will be stopping by to sign copies of their books, including David Kukoff, Kevin Smokler, Oriana Small, Antonia Crane, Harold Bronson, and Sharon Weil—and others will be attending and signing at booths throughout the weekend. In addition, certain Rare Bird authors will also be participating in official LATFB panels throughout the weekend, including:

Saturday, 3 pm, Taper Hall 201: Martin Pousson, author of Black Sheep Boy, will participate in a discussion entitled "Writing Gay Literature in Los Angeles." He will be joined by Alex Espinoza and David Francis.

Sunday, 10:30 am, Seeley G. Mudd 123: Kevin Smokler, author of Brat Pack America: A Love Letter to '80s Teen Movies, will participate in a discussion entitled "Pop Goes the World." He will be joined by Jason Diamond and Simon Roy.

Sunday, 3 pm, Salvatori Computer Science Room 101: Brian McGreevy, author of The Lights, and Pamela Ribon, author of Notes to Boys, will participate in a discussion entitled "From Page to Screen to Page." They will be joined by Tod Goldberg and Lara Parker.

Hope to see you there! 

Los Angeles in the 1970s: South Pasadena Public Library
Apr
20
7:00 pm19:00

Los Angeles in the 1970s: South Pasadena Public Library

  • South Pasadena Public Library

Contributors Steve Hodel, Chip Jacobs, Jeremy Rosenberg, and Dana Johnson will discuss the essay collection Los Angeles in the 1970s at the South Pasadena Public Library. Discussion moderated by David Kukoff, editor of Los Angeles in the 1970s.

Tobias Carroll presents REEL
Apr
12
7:00 pm19:00

Tobias Carroll presents REEL

  • Quimby's Bookstore

Tobias Carroll presents his debut novel REEL at the new Quimby's Bookstore in Brooklyn, NY. He will be joined by author Annie DeWitt, who will be presenting her new novel White Nights in Split Town City.

More info here: https://www.facebook.com/events/800567343451244/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A5%2C%22page_id_source%22%3A819249834884465%2C%22action_history%22%3A[%7B%22surface%22%3A%22page%22%2C%22mechanism%22%3A%22main_list%22%2C%22extra_data%22%3A%22%7B%5C%22page_id%5C%22%3A819249834884465%2C%5C%22tour_id%5C%22%3Anull%7D%22%7D]%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D