Jim McDermott presents Bitter Is the Wind
May
6
2:00 pm14:00

Jim McDermott presents Bitter Is the Wind

  • Barnes & Noble

Jim McDermott, author of Bitter Is the Wind, will participate in a panel with local authors about fiction writing. He will be joined by Tanya J. Peterson and William L. Sullivan.

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
7
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Zach Wyner & Why There Are Words
May
11
7:00 pm19:00

Zach Wyner & Why There Are Words

  • Studio 333

Join Why There Are Words (WTAW) on May 11, 2017, at Studio 333 in Sausalito as seven acclaimed authors including Zach Wyner, author of What We Never Had, explore the theme Suggestible. Doors open at 7pm; readings begin at 7:15. Entry fee is $10 at the door, though donations to WTAW, a 501(c)3 nonprofit are always welcome.

More information: http://www.whytherearewords.com/2017/04/18/why-there-are-words-sausalito-presents-suggestible/

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
14
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
21
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
May
28
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Los Angeles in the 1970s
Jun
8
7:00 pm19:00

Los Angeles in the 1970s

  • Glendale Public Library

David Kukoff, editor of the collection, will present Los Angeles in the 1970s along with a panel of contributors.

Shawna Kenney & Rich Dolinger present Live at the Safari Club
Sep
5
7:30 pm19:30

Shawna Kenney & Rich Dolinger present Live at the Safari Club

  • Skylight Books

Shawna Kenney and Rich Dolinger present Live at the Safari Club: A History of HarDCore Punk in the Nation's Capital, 1988-1998. They will be joined by Mike Gitter, author of xXx Fanzine 83-88 (Bridge 9 Records) and moderated by Ron Martinez, singer of Final Conflict.


Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)
Apr
30
11:00 am11:00

Gary T. McDonald reads from The Gospel of Thomas (the Younger)

  • Sunset Park Christian Church

Gary T. McDonald will be doing a series of readings from his book on five successive Sundays at 11 am.

 

The Gospel of Thomas (The Younger), while telling a captivating story,  replaces a theology based on deity worship with a prescription for living a full and happy life. It offers a humanistic and secular view of Jesus and Christianity, if such a thing is possible. It shows how Christianity took a wrong turn early on and does its best to set it straight. That’s a brazenly audacious thing to attempt—trying to change a most basic element of Western civilization and culture—but the author has done so on these pages in an enthralling and compelling way.

 

It conjures up a vivid portrait of the First Century Greco-Roman world and its larger-than-life characters: from Jesus and his disciples, to Greek philosophers, to Roman emperors and their political confidantes. Not just a novel, it is itself a gospel—a new telling of the origins of Christianity and an explosive, visionary reinterpretation of Jesus’ teachings. Besides being an entertaining read, it is painstakingly researched using Biblical scriptures and hundreds of other historical sources.

 

The novel opens with a note from the “translator/editor” who introduces this newly found gospel as a genuine First Century document. Through the eyes of Thomas, a nephew of both Jesus and the disciple we now know as Doubting Thomas, we get a comprehensive and thoughtful first-hand account of the Mediterranean world at that time.  Beginning with his recollections as a child, Thomas presents Jesus as a warm, charismatic, rustic philosopher schooled in the Pharisee tradition, who is regarded as a rabbi or teacher rather than a deity. However, immediately following Jesus’ death, his disciples are rife with political and personal turmoil and conflicting motives, spawning a splintering organizational and theological power struggle between Christians, Jews, Stoics, Emperors, and the Roman Legion. Through Thomas’ extensive travels we become witness to the blueprints of early Christianity, harrowing negotiations with Roman emperors, Hellenic shipwrecks, gruesome battles in the Holy Land, and, most importantly, relationships that transcend decades, empires, tribes, and bloodshed.

Los Angeles Times Festival of Books
Apr
22
Apr 23

Los Angeles Times Festival of Books

  • USC

Come join Rare Bird at the 2017 LA Times Festival of Books!

We will be located at Booth 125, along with our good friends at ZYZZYVA. Some of our authors will be stopping by to sign copies of their books, including David Kukoff, Kevin Smokler, Oriana Small, Antonia Crane, Harold Bronson, and Sharon Weil—and others will be attending and signing at booths throughout the weekend. In addition, certain Rare Bird authors will also be participating in official LATFB panels throughout the weekend, including:

Saturday, 3 pm, Taper Hall 201: Martin Pousson, author of Black Sheep Boy, will participate in a discussion entitled "Writing Gay Literature in Los Angeles." He will be joined by Alex Espinoza and David Francis.

Sunday, 10:30 am, Seeley G. Mudd 123: Kevin Smokler, author of Brat Pack America: A Love Letter to '80s Teen Movies, will participate in a discussion entitled "Pop Goes the World." He will be joined by Jason Diamond and Simon Roy.

Sunday, 3 pm, Salvatori Computer Science Room 101: Brian McGreevy, author of The Lights, and Pamela Ribon, author of Notes to Boys, will participate in a discussion entitled "From Page to Screen to Page." They will be joined by Tod Goldberg and Lara Parker.

Hope to see you there! 

Los Angeles in the 1970s: South Pasadena Public Library
Apr
20
7:00 pm19:00

Los Angeles in the 1970s: South Pasadena Public Library

  • South Pasadena Public Library

Contributors Steve Hodel, Chip Jacobs, Jeremy Rosenberg, and Dana Johnson will discuss the essay collection Los Angeles in the 1970s at the South Pasadena Public Library. Discussion moderated by David Kukoff, editor of Los Angeles in the 1970s.

Tobias Carroll presents REEL
Apr
12
7:00 pm19:00

Tobias Carroll presents REEL

  • Quimby's Bookstore

Tobias Carroll presents his debut novel REEL at the new Quimby's Bookstore in Brooklyn, NY. He will be joined by author Annie DeWitt, who will be presenting her new novel White Nights in Split Town City.

More info here: https://www.facebook.com/events/800567343451244/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A5%2C%22page_id_source%22%3A819249834884465%2C%22action_history%22%3A[%7B%22surface%22%3A%22page%22%2C%22mechanism%22%3A%22main_list%22%2C%22extra_data%22%3A%22%7B%5C%22page_id%5C%22%3A819249834884465%2C%5C%22tour_id%5C%22%3Anull%7D%22%7D]%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D

Brian McGreevy presents The Lights
Apr
11
7:00 pm19:00

Brian McGreevy presents The Lights

  • WORD Brooklyn

Brian McGreevy presents his latest novel The Lights.

"I was taken most seriously when listening to men listen to themselves.”

When Leda Galvan, a gifted writer who can also occasionally be given to self-destruction, gets in to the school of her dreams and sets out to make a new life in Austin, she soon discovers that the heaviest baggage cannot always be left behind.

Funny, smart, and self-aware, The Lights is also a philosophical inquiry into the nature of how we connect in our most intimate bonds, sure to please fans of both Emma Straub and Eric Rohmer. As Leda and the men in her orbit grapple with sex, betrayal, honesty, and each other, their own closely-held ideas of who they are in matters of love and art give way to transformative decisions and the revelation of what comes next.

Martin Pousson at Dirty Laundry Lit
Apr
8
7:30 pm19:30

Martin Pousson at Dirty Laundry Lit

  • The Virgil

Martin Pousson, author of Black Sheep Boy, will participate in an event with Dirty Laundry Lit. The event will be hosted by Jeff Eyres and features the following authors:

Meredith Maran

Lilliam Rivera

Marnie Goodfriend

Wendy Labinger

Gina Sorell

Mike Scalise

Chiwan Choi

$10 at the door

Panel Discussion: Los Angeles in the 1970s
Mar
30
7:29 pm19:29

Panel Discussion: Los Angeles in the 1970s

  • Wardman Library, Whittier College

David Kukoff, editor of Los Angeles in the 1970s, moderates a discussion between contributors Joe Donnelly, Lynell George, and Del Zamora in the Poet's Corner at Whittier College Library.

Emil DeAndreis presents Hard to Grip
Mar
27
7:00 pm19:00

Emil DeAndreis presents Hard to Grip

  • Changing Hands Bookstore

Emil DeAndreis presents his memoir Hard to Grip, which tells the story of how as a promising baseball player DeAndreis was struck with rheumatoid arthritis. 

Martin Pousson at the Saints & Sinners Literary Festival
Mar
25
11:30 am11:30

Martin Pousson at the Saints & Sinners Literary Festival

  • Hotel Monteleone

Martin Pousson, author of Black Sheep Boy, will read from his latest work and participate in a panel discussion entitled "Home is Where the Art Is: Or Is It?"

11:30 AM - Martin will read in the Cabildo Room at the Monteleone Hotel.

1:00 PM - Martin will join a panel discussion in Royal Salon C at the Monteleone Hotel.

Tobias Carroll presents Reel
Mar
22
7:00 pm19:00

Tobias Carroll presents Reel

  • Moon Palace Books

Tobias Carroll will present and read from his debut novel Reel. He will be joined by fellow writers Duncan B. Barlow and Dylan Hicks.

Tobias Carroll presents Reel
Mar
18
7:00 pm19:00

Tobias Carroll presents Reel

  • Leon Gallery

Tobias Carroll will read from and present his debut novel Reel. He will be joined by fellow writers Duncan B. Barlow and Miriam Suzanne.